People in the UK who are interested in rare models of motorcycles must be familiar with the British Motorcycle Charitable Trust (BMCT), as the renowned trust is supporting and promoting the restoration and promotion of old British motorcycles since 1979. It was during that year when BMCT was established not only as a charitable trust, but also as a company limited. The purpose of establishing the trust was to secure the rare models of British motorcycles, so bike enthusiasts can access them without any problem through a number of affiliated transport museums. Aside from the network of transport museums, the BMCT also enables the people to see the rare models of British bikes at different motorcycle heritage events, which take place after every twelve months.

BMCT

Aside from restoring and promoting British Motorcycles, the BMCT also support different clubs, individuals and educational institutions by offering them its resources. In addition to this, the charitable trust also retains all the information on the British motorcycles. As far as the funding is concerned, the BMCT uses legacies of motorcycle enthusiasts for restoration purpose and improving transport museums throughout the United Kingdom. Peter Wellings is currently chairing the board of trustees at BMCT, whereas the rest of the members on the board are all motorcycle enthusiasts, who are voluntarily working for the trust.

BMCT

To the extent collection of the BMCT is concerned, the trust owns different types of British motorcycles in huge numbers which are not easily available today. Therefore, the trust also spend a good chunk of its funds to restore its rare bike collection, which includes a 1911 model of Scott Flying Squirel, BSA 3.5 HP, a 1923 model Beardmore Precision and others. Aside from these bikes, BMCT has recently got hold of the last running model of Triumph Bandit which trust has given to the Coventry Transport Museum as a donation along with a rare 1923 model Carfield ‘Baby’ that had won a bronze medal by covering a distance of 1,000 miles in tough conditions when it took part in the Scottish Six Days Trial.

BMCT

Now you can see this rare model of British motorcycle at the Coventry Transport Museum, but you will not be allowed to ride it. Nevertheless, you can quench your thirst to an extent by purchasing a retro style open face helmet from RiderWear that will make you feel as if you are back in 1920s. Apart from maintaining and restoring the old bikes BMCT also uses its funds on educational and research work, but that is limited to British motorcycle industry only. Previously the trust has provided funds to the staff of Coventry Transport Museum, so they could write the history of motorcycle manufacturing in Coventry.

BMCT

The Coventry Transport Museum is not the only transport museum in the network of BMCT, as it also shares an affiliation with Brooklands Museum, Black Country Museum, Coventry Transport Museum, Beaulieu National Motor Museum, Heritage Motor Centre, National Motorcycle Museum, Haynes International Motor Museum, Sammy Miller Museum and London Motorcycle Museum. All the members of BMCT can visit the aforementioned transport museums in the UK without spending a single penny.